People often ask for me for advice on cameras. Particularly budget cameras. I think usually after making an informed decision on your first camera or 2 you know enough about cameras to choose your third. That said this will be focusing on budget cameras. Also, since I’m a videographer, video will be the primary focus.

Let’s start with function. Cliché as it sounds, slow mo is a great function for travel videography. People jumping into the ocean. A street vendor firing up the flame on a grill. Running through fields and up mountains. It’s something that if used right can be used very well, so it’s something that I love to have in my arsenal.

My first dslr camera

That being said, my first camera didn’t have slow mo at all. I used to make wedding videos, dance videos, and even some client work in Africa. It was the Canon 650D and it served me well. My main reason for buying it was money, it was a cheap camera that would get the job done (I bought it second hand for around £350). Honestly I love the colour science on Canon cameras. The images were sharp and when combined with a £50 nifty 50 (50mm 1.8f lens) you can get some great footage with it.

 

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Go Pro

GoPro’s have a very specific look and very specific use. Some people love that fish eye, hyper realistic wide lens look. I’m not a huge fan. But I always keep a Go Pro in my kit. Why? Because it’s easy to use, easy to mount and durable as f***. Going surfing? I take the Go Pro. Going skiing? Go pro! Bungy jumping! Sky diving! Even a gig! The Go pro can be a really easy and versatile way to get some extra footage. It’s also a camera I don’t mind throwing on a pole and giving to people to get some of their own footage as well. You’d be amazed by how differently people act when you point a camera at them to when they’re holding a go pro in selfie mode.

Lumix Cameras

 

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When I started the company I wanted to up my game a little. I knew I wanted slow mo, 4k and a fold out screen (sorry Sony, I just can’t get on board) and the Lumix range despite being micro 4:3 sensors seemed to fit the bill. My first was the Panasonic G80 and I think that’s still the entry level standard (G7 is also worth checking out). But personally, I’d say skip it and go straight to the GH4. It doesn’t have in built stabilisation and removed low pass filter but it just looks and feels much more like a film-makers camera. In terms of function control, histogram, shutter angle control etc. For me there just isn’t a big enough difference in the price to justify a G80 so I’m pleased I rapidly upgraded.

These days on client shoots abroad I tend to use the GH5 because it is a beast of a camera. But still if I’m travelling light and don’t want to risk the loss or damage to my A camera, I take my GH4. My Summer Dance Tignes camp video and Studio Opening Biarritz video was made completely with the GH4 and quite a lot of my Instagram pics too, so it can produce some great stuff in the right conditions.

 

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Lenses play a massively important role in all of this, but that’s a conversation for another day.

See you next week!

Love, Kallum <3